Saturday, October 03, 2015

Art & New exhibitions at London's Serpentine Galleries (part 2)

I was prompted to attend to the Government's BBC consultation - there are fears that an agenda exists to stultify the corporation - I hope that my response goes into the 'Pro' box - this week I enjoyed watching Brian Eno talking about culture on BBC 4 ((TV) (Somewhat surprisingly it really is much better watching this than just listening)  and I was also intrigued by Radio 4's 'The Bottom Line' which was looking into the art business.

Quite a bit of Eno's Peel Lecture was (I reckon) restating the obvious in different ways but his point about Adults and Art being where we paly as we get older resonated with my Wednesday trip to the Serpentine -I almost felt like running around like a kid, the outside space  this year is designed by Spanish outfit  Selgascano it's a cross between a  low budget Star Trek and Blake's 7 - great fun.

A drink in a strange planet




And the structure from  outside












The other thing that Eno spoke about was about how much is happening now - in music and everything - the example he gave was how Wah Wah had created quite s stir back in the 60's but now there were things of similar magnitude happening practically weekly and it was too easy for us to miss some (?) I'm not too sure about this being a big change we've got more than we can cope with but  perhaps this has always been so.

Part of the show


Where do we sit when's it start?















Serious sounds were in evidence

Serpentine Palisades


The second new exhibition at The Serpentine was Rachel Rose's Palisade's - this was another stimulating show but there are some irritations for me with 'Video Art' -

1) Why do the works not follow a schedule - You tend to join them half way through and I doubt that this is what the artist wants?

2) What's the idea of not having seats and being prohibited from sitting on what looks like a useful wall?


There was some serious sound equipment (Pink Floyd 's Meddle was used too) and the blurb shows that Rachael's works are asking some difficult questions but it did seem a bit sparse - perhaps in a few years there'll be a bigger portfolio for her to draw on?



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